Welcome to the NRIN website

The Netherlands Research Integrity Network (NRIN) aims to facilitate collaboration, exchange and mutual learning among all actors in the field of Research Integrity (RI) and everybody who is interested in the topic. Read more about NRIN’s goals (more…).
 
Stay up to date: Sign up for the Netherlands Research Integrity Network here or use the button in the top menu. You can choose to receive NRIN newsletters and invitations to relevant activities.
Get started to find what’s relevant for you: my interest in RI is…

 

Recent news:

 

Launch of the Revised Code of Conduct for Research Integrity (ALLEA)

All European Academies (ALLEA) published the revised European Code of Conduct for Research Integrity.
Read more about the writing of the revised code on the website of ALLEA.


Vacancy: PostDoc “Optimizing the responsible researcher: towards fair and constructive academic advancement”

The vacancy described below is also available on Academic Tranfer. Application deadline: March 31th, 2017
 

Job title: Postdoctoral Researcher Science and Evaluation Studies
Fte: 0.8
Project: “Optimizing the responsible researcher: towards fair and constructive academic advancement”
Leiden University, Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences (more…)


Vacancy: PostDoc The Myth of Null-hypothesis Significance Testing in Scientific Research

The vacancy described below is also available in Dutch on Academic Tranfer. Application deadline: March 30th, 2017
 
Job title: Postdoc The Myth of Null-hypothesis Significance Testing in Scientific Research
Fte: 0.8 (more…)


ICAI Webinar series on academic integrity: community building; role of faculty and plagiarism

The International Center of Academic Integrity spring webinars take place from February 22th till April 28th. On this page you can find an overview of the online coursers and confirmed speakers. Note that the courses are freely available for ICAI members and their guests. (more…)


The Anatomy Lesson by John Ioannidis is now online

The ‘Anatomische les’ (Anatomy Lesson) by John Ioannidis is now available on YouTube.

Read more about the Anatomy Lesson.


Interview with prof. Lex Bouter on the problems of science today (in Dutch)

Science is no longer a profession but it has become a ‘carriere’. And a very popular one; only 20 to 30 percent of the phd-students who aspire to work as scientists in the future succeed. There is simply not enough space to place them all. This is one of the interesting observations that Lex Bouter, professor of Methodology and Integrity (VU University), makes in this NRC newspaper interview (Dutch language) on the problems of science today. (more…)


Interview with Prof. Lex Bouter on Sloppy Science

In this short interview (Science Guide, Dutch language) Lex Bouter, professor of Methodology and Integrity at VU University, talks about the problem of sloppy research. Bouter argues that the current focus on serious violations of research integrity, such as fraud and falsification, conceals the fact that Questionable Research Practices are just as much –maybe even bigger- a threat to the scientific project. He then makes a case for more research and education on Questionable Research Practices (or ‘sloppy science’).


Interview (in Dutch) about the movie ‘On being a scientist’

In this short news article (Dutch language, 2016) the Dutch philosopher Bas Haring talks about the fictional movie On Being a Scientist, which he produced in collaboration with the director Joost van Ginkel. Haring explains that the movie aims to raise students’ awareness of research integrity and to prepare them for the problems and dilemma’s (the ‘dark side’ of science) they could encounter as scientists. He emphasizes that it does not provide clear-cut answers or step-by-step solutions but instead invites students to reflect and think for themselves. On Being a Scientist was funded by the Leiden University and is freely available on youtube.


Criminologists scrutinise academia in wake of scientific scandals

While scientific misconduct has never been given much attention by criminologists, over the last few years things have changed. In this short interview, Rita Faria, a lecturer in criminology at the University of Porto, explains how ’recent scientific scandals have prompted a surge of interest from criminologists into the “occupational crime” that occurs in universities.’ The term occupational crime refers to a crime that occurs as part of a job, such as white collar or “elite” crime.


A manifesto for reproducible science

‘Reproducible research practices are at the heart of sound research and integral to the scientific method.’ However, research has shown that the practice of reproducibility faces many challenges that are both cultural and systematic. The question has been raised to what extend these challenges can be met…

In this manifesto the authors make a case for optimism. (more…)


NRIN © 2014